Burda 8155

For my Seneca Garment Construction class, I had to make a lined skirt with slant pockets and a vent. I chose a pattern that had neither.

Burda 8155

Burda 8155

Still, I liked the shape well enough and decided to make the changes. A slant pocket is not so hard to add. It requires cutting the desired shape on the front pattern piece, adding seam allowance and creating a pocket bag. I was able to do this quite easily.

The new front pattern, with slant pocket.

The new front pattern, with slant pocket.

Slant pocket, left and pocket bag, right.

Slant pocket, left and pocket bag, right.

Front pattern: how it all fits together.

Front pattern: how it all fits together.

I maintained a copy of the original front pattern, to be used as the lining.

The original front pattern, now used for lining.

The original front pattern, now used for lining.

That was the easy alteration. The vent was a little trickier. The back pattern remains the same for both back pieces and one (right) lining piece. I made the vent two inches wide.

Back pattern with added vent.

Back pattern with added vent.

This piece is then used to trace the opposite (left) lining piece. They fit together like a jigsaw puzzle.

This is the left lining pattern by itself.

This is the left lining pattern by itself.

Back lining patterns for vent.

Back lining patterns for vent. Jigsaw puzzle!

For the actual construction, the marking were quite meaningless. The key is to not sew off the end of the vent, which is what I typically do when sewing regular seams. The seam must end at the point. The lining pieces will not match until later, when they are forced to do so.

I learned a lot doing this skirt. I think it turned out really well and I am pleased with my work. I had a few issues in getting there (see The 42,5 hour skirt), but I like what I ended up with.

Front.

Front.

My finishing was done well. I hand stitched the lining to the zipper tape. I really prefer this method to machine sewing, as so many fabrics, particularly lining fabrics, like to shift under the presser foot.

Waistband getting better. Handstitched lining at zip.

Handstitched lining at zip.

I am getting better and quicker at lining a vent. In this project alone, I started at about 4 hours and am down to two. I’m very fussy!

Inside the back skirt panels. You can see the lined vent and the bagging necessary for hang.

Inside the back skirt panels. You can see the lined vent and the bagging necessary for hang.

Vent.

Vent. I forgot to change to purple thread for the under  stitching!

 

My final mark was 18/20. One of my front darts was longer than the other and I had a small pucker at the waistband.

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